Camel's Milk - Sooooo Camelicious!



With more iron, an "insulin like" protein, and also being a great source of vitamins B and C, camel's milk has come up on the radar of marketers in the United States as of late. Camel's milk has been consumed as a drink and also used to make yogurt, soap and cheese in the Middle East for ages. It is said to be closer to human milk in composition than cow's milk, and therefore easier for humans to digest.

According to Ulrich Wernery, the scientific director of Dubai's Centre for Veterinary Research Laboratory:

"People with lactose intolerance can drink it with no problem, unlike cow's milk, it doesn't cause protein allergies, and it's high in insulin,"

Camel's milk is beginning to be touted as the world's latest "super food".

Camel's milk is illegal to sell in the US -- and also a bit more expensive to produce, but no worries -- they're working on it. Now that there is an increased interest in the substance, the FDA is looking into testing camel's milk and possibly soon making it available at your local grocery store.

There seem to be varying opinions on the taste, some saying it's a bit salty, and some saying it's extremely rich and a bit sweet. You taste it first and tell me about it, okay? When it does finally arrive, that is. In the meantime, me and the cows are getting along just fine! Pass me the cow's milk and some Hershey's chocolate syrup, please!

Think you'd be up to trying some ice cold, rich and creamy camel's milk? I'm not knocking it, but I'm not so sure that I'd like to try it. I'm a bit squeamish when it comes to eating and drinking certain things.

Ready to jump on the camel wagon right now? Then check out Camelicious, a premier producer of camel's milk. Gotta love that name! Camelicious, indeed! ;)


Moooooooo!

11 comments:

VetTech on July 29, 2010 at 1:05 PM said...

We drink goat's milk (well, I don't - but people do) and the estrogens in soy milk has made that so controversial...so why not?

William K Wallace on July 29, 2010 at 1:51 PM said...

I wouldn't mind tasting it just to satisfy my curiosity, but the fact that it is seemingly closer to human milk than cows milk does put me off a bit!

Passionate About Blogging on July 29, 2010 at 10:29 PM said...

Well, I hope Camelicious comes to Malaysia soon because I am interested to have a taste. Goat's milk is ok... But I still prefer cow's milk with chocolate or strawberry flavours. Hahaha... it would be nice to taste strawberry favoured Camelicious!

Brad Campbell on July 30, 2010 at 2:55 AM said...

The milk of the camel has traditionally been used to treat diabetes. Surprisingly, camel milk does seem to contain high levels of insulin or an insulin-like protein which appears to be able to pass through the stomach without being destroyed. It's also said that camel's milk is good for anti-infection and anti-cancer but I haven't found any scientific research reports regarding those matters.

Don E. Chute on July 30, 2010 at 9:00 AM said...

I'll try it. On two conditions. I don't grow 2 humps and it doesn't ruin the taste of Bailey's.

Have a Fitness Diva weekend!

PLU!

jellybelly on July 31, 2010 at 10:56 PM said...

I've never heard of camel's milk. Now I'm curious how it tastes. The best I've tried so far is carabao's milk. Delicious!

Dori on August 7, 2010 at 10:04 AM said...

I'd love to give this a try. I'm very curious about how it tastes.

Mr Camels on November 18, 2011 at 9:55 PM said...

I'm from Somalia where camel is everything. We use it as means of transport, milk, for protein, to treat diabetes and other illnesses and also we use camels to pay compensations to settle clan disputes and dowry during marriages. Basically camel is the most treasured animal of possession in Somalia.

In the 80s, there were roughly 7 million Somalis and 5 million camels in Somalia. We are the camel nation of the world.

We love camel milk. We drink it fresh or use charcoal to give it this distinctive taste. Camel milk is almost zero fat and we never use it to make butter or other fatty products, for that we use cow or goat milk.

Often in Somalia, we drink camel milk, we use goat milk for tea and cereals and cow milk is not popular.

We don't use camel milk for tea or cereals because it does not have sweet taste, it often tastes like the plant the camel ate. Thats why its good form of medicine, they eat all types of plants from high trees where cows can not reach to low grassing areas.

We are nation very passion of camels. We exported camels to the world including Arabia, who originally had the two humps also known as the Bactrian camel.

Camel milk can reduce blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes. Its so fresh and amazing we take great pride in camels.

Also in Somalia, the nomads or camel herders known as geel jire are the most fit, tallest, fastest and healthiest people in Somalia. If you want your child to grow tall, we often introduce him/her to camel milk. Basically if you sleep longer and drink camel milk, you will gain longitudinal height. No gravity acting on your body and calcium for strong bones = height.

The world might see as as uneducated nomads but we know our fields very well.

Right now in the West, we often send our kids to Somalia for camel milk seasons to gain cultural enlightenment and to improve their health by fighting obesity, depression and other health problems in the West.

You can call your top professors and doctors and ask them to compare cow milk and camel milk. We know the benefits.

God bless Somalia and camels.

Mr Camels on November 18, 2011 at 9:58 PM said...

I doubt Camelicious produces the authentic camel milk. Only a Somali nomad knows the true secret. Anything thats commercialized is often ruined. Your not getting the real thing. They will remove the smell, add artificials, flavouring, color, preservatives, agents, etc.

David Haas on April 27, 2012 at 7:50 AM said...

Hi,
I have a quick question about your blog, do you think you could email me?
David

straight55B on October 9, 2012 at 11:41 AM said...

when willwe camal milk at loacl stores in nyc

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